Top concerns regarding the family based immigration process

Family-based immigration is the process of applying for permanent residency (a green card) via a partner or other household member. This process can be particularly complicated, lengthy (sometimes lasting years), and frustrating for the applicant that must be fingerprinted, undergo a thorough medical examination and subject herself to a thorough security clearance test. A spouse […]

Family-based immigration is the process of applying for permanent residency (a green card) via a partner or other household member. This process can be particularly complicated, lengthy (sometimes lasting years), and frustrating for the applicant that must be fingerprinted, undergo a thorough medical examination and subject herself to a thorough security clearance test. A spouse of a United States citizen may apply for permanent resident status (a green card) and get a work permit within America, only if the partner. Generally, if neither of them is the case then the partner must Leave America and return to their home country to proceed with the process of Consular Processing (applying for permanent residence from overseas).

Immigration officials run very detailed reviews of marital relationships when an immigration case is based upon a union. According to a new department of homeland security report almost half of spousal immigration cases are fraudulent. At a minimum, for a union to be considered valid for immigration purposes, each party should have been legally able to marry at the time of their union (i.e. all prior divorces were final), the marriage ceremony should have been considered lawful under the laws in which it had been completed, and the couple should have married out of an actual desire to enter into a marital relationship and not merely for immigration purposes.

Common law marriages are approved for immigration purposes if they are legally recognized by the law at the area of residence of the bunch. In these situations, however, extra evidence generally has to be filed to support the common law marriage-based petition. Customary marriages, those performed in accordance with local custom but not licensed by civil governments, may be legal if the law of the country in which the marriage occurred admits the union as valid. Same sex unions, however, even though they might be lawful in the state or country where the marriage was conducted, aren’t known for immigration purposes (because of the lack of national recognition of the validity of same-sex unions). This policy may change later on and For more details about immigration process visit here. This being said, there are essential variations to be made, to start with, concerning applying for immigration within any state.